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Bush Stone-curlews new island home

The Penguin Foundation is proud to support an exciting new threatened species program led by Phillip Island Nature Parks which aims to establish a self-sustaining wild population of Bush Stone-curlews on Phillip Island (Millowl).

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The Penguin Foundation is proud to support an exciting new threatened species program led by Phillip Island Nature Parks which aims to establish a self-sustaining wild population of Bush Stone-curlews on Phillip Island (Millowl).

These unique and remarkable ground-dwelling birds are listed as endangered in Victoria. Red foxes wiped out Phillip Island’s (Millowl) Bush Stone-curlews in the 1970s, but since the island was declared fox-free in 2017, there is now opportunity to provide a safe-haven for the curlews and boost Victoria’s population.

Two young Bush Stone-curlew birds have recently been welcomed to the Koala Conservation Reserve from Moonlit Sanctuary. Here they will spend time behind-the-scenes settling in before moving into a specialised pre-release aviary within the Reserves public woodland area so visitors can see and get to know more about these new island residents.

“The ultimate goal is for these two birds to be part of a future wild Bush Stone-curlew release as we re-introduce them to Phillip Island, and I am excited for the community to meet them and learn about their plight. This will allow people to connect with their story of near extinction and learn how they can act to protect Bush Stone-curlews and other wildlife species on Phillip Island (Millowl)” said Thomas Nixon, Nature Parks Threatened Species Officer.

The project is thanks to the work of a dedicated Nature Parks team in collaboration with Nature Conservation Working Group, Moonlit Sanctuary, Mulligans Flat Woodland Sanctuary and the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP).

The Penguin Foundation board is thrilled to support this work which forms part of our 2021-2022 signature funding program ‘Protecting and enhancing the status of Threatened Species on Phillip Island’ and would like to acknowledge and thank our generous donors for contributing to this important and significant project.

More about Bush Stone-curlews

Bush Stone-curlews stand around 55cm tall and inhabit open forests and grassy woodlands, spending days sheltering on the ground among fallen trees and debris which provide camouflage and safety, and nights travelling up to 3km from their roosting sites to feed primarily on insects, as well as small vertebrates and fruits and seeds.

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